Learning and Talent Development
Office of Talent Management, Office of Human Resources

UPCOMING EVENTS
                                                                

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Introduction to Plain Language
January 10, 2018, 10:00 - 11:30 am
21 N Park Street, Room 1106

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Thrive@UW Madison - Building and Managing Work Relationships
January 31, 2018, 1:00 - 4:00 pm
21 N Park Street, Room 5045

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Thrive@UW Madison - Communicating Effectively for Authentic Collaboration
February 6, 2018, 1:00 - 4:00 pm
21 N Park Street, Room 5045

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Thrive@UW Madison - Expanding Self-Knowledge to Adapt and Thrive
February 8, 2018, 9:00 am - 12:00 pm
21 N Park Street, Room 5045

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Thrive@UW Madison - Thriving in a Time of Change
February 13, 2018, 1:00 - 4:00 pm
21 N Park Street, Room 5045

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Thrive@UW Madison - Creating Inclusive Work Environments
February 14, 2018, 9:00 am - 12:00 pm
21 N Park Street, Room 5045 

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Write with Plain Language
February 16, 2018, 9:00 - 11:00 am
21 N Park Street, Room 1106

NEW! Register Today!
Design for Plain Language
March 2, 2018, 9:00 - 11:00 am
21 N Park Street, room 1106

NEW! Register Today!
Thrive@UW Madison - Expanding Self-Knowledge to Adapt and Thrive
March 6, 2018, 1:00 - 4:00 pm
21 N Park Street, Room 5045


NEW! Register Today!
Thrive@UW Madison - Thriving in a Time of Change
March 8, 2018, 9:00 am - 12:00 pm
21 N Park Street, Room 5045


NEW! Register Today!
Introduction to Plain Language
March 13, 2018, 1:00 - 2:30 pm
21 N Park Street, Room 1106

NEW! Register Today!
Thrive@UW Madison - Creating Inclusive Work Environments
March 14, 2018, 1:00 - 4:00 pm
21 N Park Street, Room 5045

NEW! Register Today!
Thrive@UW Madison - Communicating Effective for Authentic Collaboration
March 15, 2018, 1:00 - 4:00 pm
21 N Park Street, Room 5045

NEW! Register Today!
Thrive@UW Madison - Building and Managing Work Relationships
March 21, 2018, 1:00 - 4:00 pm
21 N Park Street, Room 5045 

NEW! Register Today!
Introduction to Plain Language
June 4, 2018, 1:00 - 2:30 pm
21 N Park Street, Room 1106

NEW! Register Today!
Write with Plain Language
June 29, 2018, 9:00 - 11:00 am
21 N Park Street, Room 5045

NEW! Register Today!
Design with Plain Language
July 13, 2018, 9:00 - 11:00 am
21 N Park Street, Room 5045

NEW! Register Today!
Introduction to Plain Language
August 6, 2018, 1:00 - 2:30 pm
21 N Park Street, Room 1106

NEW! Register Today!
Introduction to Plain Language
October 23, 2018, 10:00 - 11:30 am
21 N Park Street, Room 5045

NEW! Register Today!
Write with Plain Language
November 30, 2018, 2:30 - 4:30 pm
21 N Park Street, Room 1106

NEW! Register Today!
Design with Plain Language
December 7, 2018, 9:00 - 11:00 am
21 N Park Street, Room 1106


Thank You
Event Partners

UW Foundation Women's Philanthropy Council

UW-Madison
Committee on Women
in the University
 

Volunteer Tutors Needed
Cultural Linguistic Services, within the Office of Talent Management, is in need of tutors to help UW-Madison employees develop their learning in areas such as: English language, literacy (English and Spanish), writing, math, and other subjects. Scheduling and meeting locations are flexible. To become a tutor, complete an application or contact Jzong Thao at jzong.thao@wisc.edu.

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Learn about UWell- the comprehensive wellness initiative aiming to advance the health and well-being of the entire UW-Madison community.

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If you are interested in requesting to have an event registration posted on the Office of Talent Management Site, please complete your event information ​HERE.


The WiGrow program is an engagement effort aimed to increase the positive impact of student employment through supervisor and student employee conversations.
 

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UW-Madison

Women & Leadership Symposium 2017



Featured Session topics are subject to change.

 

Being In The Kitchen & Not On The Menu

Sara Finger 


The truth is - if you don't speak up, you can't be heard. This workshop will help attendees learn to awaken the advocate inside them and gain skills to have policy at all levels happen WITH you rather than TO you. This session will provide insights and tools for anyone looking to dip their toe, wade in or bathe in the advocacy "waters". 


Since June of 2004, Sara Finger has been leading the effort to develop a new organizational coalition to unite, coordinate and amplify the voices of women’s health supporters in Wisconsin.  Prior to assuming this role, Sara was the Northeast Director of Membership and Professional Relations for the Wisconsin Medical Society. She received her undergraduate degree in Political Science from the University of Wisconsin Eau Claire. She was a 2009 Mid-America Public Health Leadership Institute Fellow and is Past President of the Wisconsin Public Health Association. In 2010, Sara received a Champion of Women’s Health Award from the Wisconsin Women’s Health Foundation. In 2011, she was recognized by the Wisconsin Coalition Against Sexual Assault with a Voices of Courage Award. In 2012, Sara was honored with a HealthWatch Wisconsin Outreach Effort Award for her coordination work of the Save BadgerCare Coalition, an Outstanding Recent Alumni Award from UW Eau Claire, was named a Woman to Watch by BRAVA Magazine and was named a Champion of Change by the White House for her work related to the Affordable Care Act.  In 2015, The Business Forum of Madison honored Sara with an Athena Young Professional Award.


Being Intentional: Reflecting to Inform Our Professional Present and Future

Leslie Orrantia


We strive to produce our best work which often means we emotionally and mentally exhaust ourselves in the process. Given our ambious aims for structure, representation and sustainability, it's possible we encounter difficulty producing to expectation and end up disappointed having fallen just short of our goals. Such burnout can easily result in our inability to commit to the work for the long term. However, with intentionality in our present actions as well as our plans for our future, we can strike a balance to assist us in achieving our aims. Through listening to others to inform our contributions and networking to develop ourselves within our current position while building opportunity for our next, intentionality can bring us patience, understanding, and compassion, for our personal and professional success.


Leslie Orrantia is UW-Madison Director of Community Relations. On behalf of Chancellor Blank, she is point-of-contact for city and county relations, oversees the UW South Madison Partnership, and facilitates connections between campus and community. She formerly served as assistant director for The Network within UW’s School of Education, building partnerships across the state to transform education. Previously, she spent five years in casework which continue to influence her work in eliminating gaps in opportunity.

 Leslie is a Big Sister, member of Sustain Dane’s Board of Directors, and serves on several campus and community initiatives, many focused on education and equity. She recently completed service as VP of Public Relations on the executive team for the Latino Professionals Association.


Originally from Southern California, Leslie is a first-generation college graduate with a BA in psychology and sociology from Mount Holyoke.  In 2016, she was named a "Brava Women to Watch" recipient.

 

 

Building Collaboration and Communication Skills

Julie Kovalaske


A number of surveys reveal employers are looking for employees who can effectively collaborate and communicate. These skills are in high-demand as the workplace shifts. Attend this interactive workshop, where you will have an opportunity to practice and discuss your strengths, and identify where you can continue to improve

 

Julie Kovalaske is the training manager of the Fully Prepared to Manage Program with UW-Madison and a member of the Academic Staff Mentoring Committee.  She has over six years of experience designing and facilitating professional development opportunities to support employee skills. Prior to UW-Madison she worked for three years in the Peace Corps in Tanzania providing training, education and development opportunities in the community she lived and two years providing professional training and development opportunities with Cabela’s. Her focus is on providing engaging, participant-driven experiences.




Communicating with Assertiveness and Confidence 

Jessica Swenson

 

To be heard and respected, you must communicate with confidence and assertiveness.  The good news is that both assertiveness and confidence are skills that can be developed through practice and awareness. This session will explore what assertiveness is (and isn’t) and practical ways to begin developing that skill.  We will also explore ways to build self-confidence through self-efficacy and –esteem.  Being aware of and building your own feelings of self-worth will naturally help you communicate more confidently. 


Jessica Swenson is the Program Manager for the Fully Prepared to Lead program offered through Learning and Talent Development at UW Madison.  She’s been teaching leadership and professional development courses for over 14 years while consulting with and coaching employees, supervisors, and managers on a variety of topics. A graduate of UW-Madison, she has facilitated workshops for the Women & Leadership Symposium, the Teaching and Learning Symposium, and Leadership Sun Prairie. Additionally, she serves as co-chair for the Leadership @ UW Madison initiative. Areas of expertise include Performance Management, Professional Development and Leadership Development. 



Creating a Resonant Yes through the Power of No

Sarah Young


Attending the event even though we don’t want to. Saying “sure, I can help!” even though it puts us behind on our own work. Overcommitting to the point that we are tired, stressed out, and edgy. Saying “yes” because we think saying “no” will be rude. Sound familiar? If so, you’re not alone. As women, we often find ourselves saying “yes” to try to be nice, to avoid hurting someone’s feelings, or to be helpful. However, when we do, we’re sometimes saying “no” to ourselves and actually diminishing our positive impact in the world, by focusing on the things that aren’t fully aligned with our values and our purpose. During this interactive, high-energy, and thought-provoking experience we will:

• Explore the “myths of saying yes”

• Understand the immediate and long term impacts of saying “yes” when we really want to say “no”

• Discover how to say “no” from a place of kindness and generosity

• Explore how sometimes in order to increase our overall positive impact, we need to decrease the things we are saying yes to

• Learn specific tools and approaches to use in everyday life and in challenging situations


Sarah Young works with big thinkers and inspiring teams to increase their positive impact in the world. Prior to launching Zing Collaborative, Sarah spent 8 years in the corporate world leading people, projects and teams, and became obsessed with human potential. Sarah blends corporate experience, research, mindfulness, leadership, coaching, and experiential learning with the goal of empowering organizations, teams, and individuals to get great results in a way that feels inspired and alive. Her clients range from healthcare companies to top universities to high-tech startups to construction crews to state agencies. Regardless of the industry, they share one thing in common: they are serious about increasing their positive impact and tapping into their full humanity to do so. When she's not engaged in conversations with clients, you'll find Sarah camping, riding her fat bike through the woods, experimenting in the kitchen, or hanging out with her favorite 2-legged and 4-legged companions. 



Diversity and Inclusion: Developing Cultural Dexterity and Mitigating Bias

Binnu Palta Hill 


Cultural dexterity has become an increasing valuable skill in today’s diverse and global workplace. According to a survey of 1370 CEO’s across the globe conducted by PricewaterhouseCoopers, it is now considered to be a critical professional skill rather than a ‘soft skill’. Research shows that diverse teams operating in an inclusive culture outperform those that are homogeneous, and are also more innovative due to the varied perspectives and experiences of its members. Team members in these groups are much more likely to have a shared vision of success and are personally committed to the success of the team. Diverse teams operating in an inclusive culture also have high levels of individual satisfaction and high rates of retention. In today’s global economy with changing demographics, a diverse and culturally competent workforce has become a competitive advantage for organizations. Diversity and inclusion today are no longer a compliance issue; instead, they are a strategic imperative.

One of the key challenges in cultivating inclusion, where each member of the team can contribute to his/her fullest potential, is bias. Given that bias is an inherently human trait, in this session, we will explore what it means to be a culturally competent professional and an inclusive leader by acknowledging and understanding your own blind spots. We will discuss concepts and practice skills for enhancing awareness of and addressing conscious and unconscious biases. Additionally, we will review the latest research on how unconscious bias affects behavior, and strategies for addressing unconscious bias in the workplace.


With more than 18 years of work experience in the University of Wisconsin System, Binnu Palta Hill joined the Wisconsin School of Business in 2006. In her role as Assistant Dean for Diversity and Inclusion, and as a member of the Dean’s Leadership Team, she works closely with the Dean to develop a diversity strategy congruent with the mission and business strategy of the school. Ms. Hill also works closely with the school’s Diversity Advisory Board, comprised of executives from the corporate sector to seek and employ best practices from industry.

 Under her leadership, the Wisconsin School of Business has made significant progress diversifying its faculty, staff, and student population and cultivating inclusion. Ms. Hill founded “Diversity Lunch & Learns,” discussion forums on sensitive topics such as ethnicity, race, gender, and sexual orientation. These forums allow students, faculty, and staff to share their own experiences with diversity and how the resulting tensions influence team dynamics and organizational culture. As the School’s chief diversity officer, Ms. Hill represents the Wisconsin School of Business on the UW-Madison campus diversity leadership team. In May 2015, Ms. Hill represented the Wisconsin School of Business at the White House as Wisconsin became one of the first business schools to commit to best practices for increasing opportunities in business for women and preparing a culturally competent 21st Century workforce. In Fall 2016, she was recognized for her contributions to campus and the community by UW-Madison with the Outstanding Woman of Color award.

 Prior to joining the Wisconsin School of Business, Ms. Hill served as the Program Manager for the PEOPLE Program, a pre-college program designed to increase the number of under-represented minority and first-generation students at UW-Madison. She also co-chaired the UW-Extension Chancellor’s Diversity Council and served on the advisory board for the Governor’s Youth Summit. Ms. Hill has led workshops and presentations at conferences throughout the country including National Conference on Race and Ethnicity, University of Wisconsin Diversity Forum, Women and Leadership Conference, and Ascend’s The Power of Diversity conference. She also works with organizations in the public and private sectors to help leaders develop skills to cultivate inclusion, embed inclusive policies and practices into the organization and develop an organizational diversity strategy that functions as a competitive advantage. Ms. Hill holds a Bachelor’s degree from UW-Madison and a Master’s in Business Administration from UW-Whitewater.


Engaging in Effective Strategic Planning 

Elizabeth Paice


Where are we?  Where do we want to go?  How are we going to get there?  These are just some of the questions that effective strategic planning can address.  This workshop will introduce participants to three key phases of strategic planning: Assessment, Plan Creation, and Plan Implementation.  Participants will learn about tools that organizations can use to engage in each of these phases, as well as best practices and common pitfalls associated with strategic planning.  The workshop will include opportunities for discussion, as well as time for individual reflection.  Are you interested in taking your organization to the next level, but not sure what strategic planning entails?  Then this workshop is for you!

Engaging in Effective Strategic Planning Presentation.pdf 

Engaging in Effective Strategic Planning Handout.pdf

Elizabeth Paice is an Internal Consultant in the Office of Quality Improvement at UW-Madison.  In her role Elizabeth helps units across campus define and achieve their goals.  Elizabeth came to UW-Madison from The Ohio State University where she earned a Master of Arts in Higher Education and Student Affairs, as well as a Master of Public Administration. While completing her graduate coursework Elizabeth worked for The Ohio State University Honors & Scholars Center as well as the Ohio Department of Education.  Prior to working in higher education, Elizabeth served as a Management and Program Analyst with the Federal Bureau of Investigation in Washington, D.C., supporting the organization’s strategy management and performance improvement efforts.  Elizabeth holds Bachelor’s degrees in Psychology and Political Science from the University of Massachusetts Amherst and is experienced in strategic planning, performance measurement, performance facilitation, program evaluation, and project management.


Finding Space for Wellness in Your Life: The 5Minutes4Myself Approach

Beth Larson


Despite best intentions, most of us find it difficult to make changes we value to improve our health and well-being. This workshop will describe research on flourishing in our work, social, community, financial and physical well-being. Next, The 5Minutes4Myself approach—using micro interventions that fit within existing “ecological slots” within our daily rhythms (an energy cycles) will be introduced to participants. In hands-on exercises, participants will consider the spaces and places in their lives available to engage in activities that will improve wellness. The majority of the workshop will be devoted to a process where participants begin by envision a lifestyle change to promote wellness, discuss their reasons for change/staying the same, write SMART goals and begin to strategically plan or take steps toward a desired lifestyle change. 

5Minutes4Myself handout.pdf

Dr. Elizabeth Larson is an occupational therapist and occupational scientist with over thirty years of clinical and research experience working with children with disabilities and their families. Her clinical experience has shaped both her teaching and research. Her most recent work focuses on wellness promotion for caregivers, college students and elementary school students.  She has designed a freshman course entitled Living Well: Lifestyle balance and wellness promotion. In this course students track their time use for six days and complete an assignment to change daily routines over six week’s time in a way that promotes better lifestyle balance. She also co-teaches a course on motivational interviewing, an evidence-based approach to promoting lifestyle change. The focus on wellness is also prominent in her research projects:  5Minutes4Myself a wellness program for caregivers of children with autism; the Active Classroom Engagement (ACE) project and in a project assessing college student’s well-being and time-use. The 5Minutes4Myself project, a tailored micro-intervention hybrid app/coaching wellness program for caregivers was  developed with funding from the American Occupational Therapy Foundation and a Virginia Horne Henry Award. The Active Classroom Engagement project, funded by the Madison Foundation for Public Schools, created five “active” elementary school classrooms with 125 standing desks and a movement break curriculum for 3rd to 5th students. In 2015, Dr. Larson was appointed as a fellow of the American Occupational Therapy Association. She was also awarded a Vilas Life Cycle Professorship Award, and service awards from the Society for the Study of Occupation: USA and Mixed Methods International Research Association for her role in establishing these organizations and serving on their inaugural boards. 


Geezer. Punk. Whatever. Bridging the Generational Divide

Alex Draginis 

Generational differences. We keep hearing about it, and we keep expecting the buzz to go away. But it's not. With 47% of the full-time workforce currently under 34 years old, and up to 75% of the workforce being Millennial by 2025, teams are trying to figure out what and if internal and external processes need to change, and how to hire, retain, communicate and motivate in a world of shifting demographics. In this interactive session, we'll move beyond, "Here's who the generations are," to what can we practically do as our demographics change. Together, we'll discuss practical advice and examples of what has worked across organizations, as we work to grow our understanding of what businesses need to do to continue viable, healthy organizations.

Alex Draginis joined Accent Learning and Consulting in 2015, bringing a fresh, Millennial perspective on the workforce. Her experience working across generations and with diverse teams helps groups appreciate seen and unseen strengths as we work toward common goals. Her transition to Accent allows her to use her experience working across generations in a public service role and combines it with her passion for education. Alex has a degree in educational policy from the University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee.


Holistic Stress Management 

Debra Lafler 

 

Debra introduces concepts about navigating the stress management landscape. She introduces us to the understanding of stress in our lives; the interconnectedness of our body, mind and spirit; and then guides us through self-management techniques.  Debra introduces simple breath-work, relaxation and meditation methods, but also helps us focus on the important inner-work of centering, recognizing and moving energy through our bodies, letting go, and developing acceptance, compassion, and trust.  After discussion, she provides us with an opportunity to practice with a meditation, and a writing activity.  Participants walk away with a renewed sense of optimism and confidence in themselves and their abilities to manage stress. 

[Delivery Method: Lecture Style with a Powerpoint Presentation, Videos, and Worksheets]

 Holistic Stress Management_Debra Lafler 2017.pdf


Debra Lafler is a locally well-known wellness consultant and moving motivational speaker.  She has delivered seminars at team meetings, trainings, and conferences. 

Academically, Debra has earned a Doctorate degree in Spiritual Studies from The Emerson Institute, a Master of Arts degree in Health & Behavior Studies with a focus in Health Education from Columbia University, and a Bachelor’s degree in Communication with Certificates in Wellness and Coaching from the University of Wisconsin-Parkside.  She has additional training in worksite wellness, yoga, meditation and holistic stress management. 

Debra’s approach provides an integrated body-mind-spirit perspective.  She believes that “wellness is a life-long process of self-discovery and self-improvement. This process is about progress, and not perfection.”  Her mission is to help others foster their own personal wellbeing through awareness, curiosity and self-compassion; and her hope is that this will have a ripple effect outward to affect many others.


Leadership and Community Development: A Purposeful Direction

Mayra Medrano


There is personal and professional benefits to volunteering but how does leadership align with the impact of volunteering as it pertains to community development? Whether you are an emerging professional or have spent years in the workforce in this session we will discuss the importance of civic engagement, participation on non-profit boards, and how each one of us has a scope of influence for meaningful dialogue with our peers, colleagues, and neighbors for a positive community impact.


Mayra Medrano is a first generation American from Los Angeles, CA.  Mayra is Madison Gas and Electric Company’s Business Community Service Manager and is account lead to Madison area’s small businesses and large commercial customers including Fortune 50 companies. Mayra serves on numerous boards and committees directly involved in regional planning, economic development, and emerging leadership in philanthropy. She is currently Chair of the Latino Chamber of Commerce of Dane County, Co-Chair of A Greater Madison Vision, President of The Public Market Foundation, and the 2017 Chair of United Way of Dane County’s Rosenberry Society.

Additionally, in 2016, Mayra was named on the list of Wisconsin’s 48 most powerful Latinos by Wisconsin State Journal – Madison365. The Business Forum recognized her as the 2016 Athena young professional award winner.


Leading with Authenticity

Shiva Bidar, MA, CHI™, CDM

 

To  lead with authenticity you need to have a deep understanding of your own leadership style and build a high level of self-awareness.  In this session we will explore the importance of authentic leadership and how it positively impacts you professional and personal life.

Shiva Bidar is the Chief Diversity Officer at UW Health, an integrated health system serving 618,000 patients each year in Wisconsin, Northern Illinois and beyond with 1,400 physicians, six hospitals, and 80 outpatient sites. In this capacity, Ms. Bidar provides vision, coordination and strategic leadership for the design and implementation of UW Health's initiatives related to diversity, equity, and inclusion. During her tenure at UW Health, Ms. Bidar has developed a model interpreter-services program and served as an organization-wide resource on cultural competency and diversity issues.  Ms. Bidar has made significant contributions to our community holding many key roles, including co-chair of the Latino Health Council of Dane County, member of the Madison College Board of Trustees, Madison Community Foundation board member and United Way of Dane County Vision Council member. Ms. Bidar is a founding member and co-chair of the Madison Area Diversity Roundtable, a coalition of employers committed to diversity and inclusionary practices.

Ms. Bidar also serves on the City of Madison Common Council. She was first elected in 2009. She has serves as the Common Council President Pro-Tem and President.

Ms. Bidar is actively engaged in many philanthropic and community based events, holding multiple board appointments and supporting numerous community causes. Her work in the areas of diversity, equity and inclusion has been recognized with the following awards:

  • 2016 “15 of Madison’s Most Influential People” In Business Magazine
  • 2016 ATHENA Leadership Award Recipient
  • 2010 City-County MLK Jr. Humanitarian Award
  • 2005 YWCA Woman of Distinction Award
  • 2002 "One of the 50 most influential Madisonians" Madison Magazine
  • 2000 City of Madison/Dane County Public Health Award for Multicultural Health Care

Education:

  • BA, Université du Hainaut, Mons, Belgium
  • MA, Monterey Institute of International Studies, Monterey, California
  • Certificate in Diversity Management in Health Care (CDM), Institute for Diversity in Healthcare/Georgetown University



Managing Priorities

Jenny Faust

 

Do you find that you often have more on your "to do" list at the end of a day than at the beginning? Are you interrupted so often that you don't have time to focus on what is important? Do you have trouble finding time for your family and friends? All busy leaders struggle with these issues, but they can be especially challenging for women. In this interactive, case-based workshop, we will focus on solutions to this common set of problems that we all face. You will leave with practical solutions and resources that you can begin to apply immediately. Topics include: setting realistic goals, putting project time on your calendar, strategies to ensure that you get (uninterrupted) work time daily, and overcoming common distractions at work.

 

UW WL PPT Managing Priorities.pdf

Jenny Faust Handout.pdf


Dr. Jennifer (Jenny) Faust currently serves as an internal consultant in the Office of Quality Improvement at the University of Wisconsin, Madison. In that capacity, she works with departments and programs across the university on strategic planning, departmental culture and climate, professional development, and process improvement. Prior to her current position, she served for twenty years as a faculty member in philosophy, a department chair, and an academic administrator. The common thread running through her career in higher education, from faculty member to academic administrator to consultant, is a commitment to faculty, staff, and student success in high quality academic programs. Leadership development has continued to be an avenue of interest, as this is where she can “pay it forward.”


Mindfulness: It's More Than Meditation

Julia Yates


This will be an audience participation based discussion on using mindful awareness to examine stress reactions and resiliency tools from a place of non-judgmental curiosity.  I will start the discussion by defining mindfulness and exploring the powerful role of vulnerability when using mindfulness to increase self-awareness.

 

I will then lead the audience in two interactive exercises: the first inviting us to openly and honestly explore our triggers and reactions to stress, and the second inviting us to realistically explore what actually works in bringing us back to state of wellness and resiliency.

 

This discussion’s take home message: We all react to stress, and we all need resiliency strategies that work specifically for us

 

Julia Yates (LCSW) is an experienced psychotherapist and teaching faculty with UW Department of Family Medicine and Community Health (DFMCH). She has specialized training in motivational interviewing and structural family therapy. Julia coordinates the DFMCH’s behavioral science curriculum and has a continuity practice at the UW Health Verona Clinic. She is passionate about resident education, whole person health approaches, and patient centered care.  Julia served as chair of the DFMCH’s wellness and resiliency task force and will now serve as director of the newly appointment wellness and resiliency board for DFMCH. Julia’s other interests include working with adolescent populations, empowerment approaches in psychotherapy, mindfulness practice and meditation, and incorporating acceptance and commitment therapy into primary care teaching and practice.

 


Momagers!

Falicia Hines & Rebecca Scheller

 

Women and parents serve in a variety of leadership roles across campus. We contribute to key leadership decisions, shape the classroom experience, mentor colleagues, and supervise staff as we work together to advance the university’s mission. Behind the scenes, we also struggle to balance our professional and family roles while maintaining credibility in our careers. We find ourselves asking, “Am I making the right decision for my career?” or “Am I doing the right thing for my family?” Where “leaning in” has become a widely accepted concept, we also wonder “Is it ever okay to just lean out?”  This session will highlight some of the challenges working parents face, and some suggested strategies and tips the panelists have employed to continue moving the dial both at home and at work. 

 

Women and Leadership Symposium_Momagers presentation_062917.pdf


Falicia Hines is a senior associate director of alumni relations at the Wisconsin School of Business, where she and her team develop strategies to communicate and engage with alumni and donors. As a mother of two young girls, she is increasingly passionate about building community among working parents at UW and beyond. Falicia is a writer for the local Madison Moms Blog and holds a B.A. in Communication Arts from UW – Madison and a master’s in Strategic Public Relations from the George Washington University.

Rebecca Scheller serves as the assistant dean for admissions & financial aid at the University of Wisconsin Law School.  A graduate of both UW-Madison and the University of Wisconsin Law School, she oversees recruitment as well as admissions and scholarship administration.  Rebecca currently serves on a number of campus, statewide and national committees, including the Committee on Women in the University, the State Bar Diversity & Inclusion Oversight Committee and as a member of the Board of Trustees for the Law School Admission Council.  Rebecca has been recognized as a Wisconsin Law Journal Up and Coming Lawyer, she has received honorable mention for the Vanguard Prize, and most recently, she and the UW Law admissions team were recognized by the Wisconsin State Bar as Legal Innovators for their diversity work.  Of course, her greatest accomplishment is serving as a mom to two young children.


Negotiating Your Way to Success 

Lynn Freeman 


Negotiating is about resolving differences. People who master the process of negotiation develop a higher degree of satisfaction at home and at work, and earn greater respect in their communities. Studies have repeatedly shown that men use negotiation to promote their own interests far more often than women do. This has significant implications for individuals AND for organizations.

This workshop will provide you with the basics of negotiation, including a variety of strategies and techniques to promote effective communication in negotiation; and a discussion about how to use these techniques in the workplace. 

Lynn Freeman is the Director of Learning & Talent Development (formerly OHRD). Lynn has 25 years of experience in public and private higher education across the country, and has provided organizational development consulting to non-profits, community groups, and colleges and universities.


Owning our Stories: A Path to Authentic Leadership

Police Chief Kristen Roman


Author Brene Brown says, “To be alive is to be vulnerable; to be a leader is to be vulnerable every minute of the day. You don’t get to opt out.”  Authentic leadership requires courage, emphasizes self-awareness and promotes legitimacy through relational transparency and fair-mindedness.  In this workshop, participants will explore the process of cultivating authentic leadership and discuss the importance of owning our stories.  Understanding that balance is vital to career endurance and mistakes are an essential ingredient of success, authentic leadership asks us that we let ourselves be seen and sit with discomfort.  In so doing, our vulnerabilities have the power to lead us to our greatest strengths.

Learning objectives:

1.       Understand the power of storytelling

2.       Identify key components of authentic leadership

3.       Consider the unique challenges for women in leadership

4.       Understand the benefits for integrating authentic leadership behaviors 


Women and Leadershp Symposium Workshop.pdf

Kristen Roman was appointed Chief of Police/Associate Vice Chancellor of the UW-Madison Police Department in January of 2017.  She holds a master’s degree in Criminal Justice from Boston University, and a bachelor’s degree in English from the University of Wisconsin-Madison.  While a student at UW-Madison, she was a member of the UW Volleyball team.

Prior to her appointment, Chief Roman served for 26 years with the City of Madison Police Department.  During her tenure there she held a variety of positions including Police Officer, Recruiting Officer, Community Relations Sergeant, Professional Standards & Internal Affairs Lieutenant, Detective Lieutenant, Patrol Operations Lieutenant, Crisis Negotiation Team Commander, and Community Outreach Captain.  In addition, she coordinated department Critical Incident Stress Management efforts and supervised the department’s Peer Support Program.

A defining feature of Chief Roman’s career is her extensive work in the area of improving police services to people with mental illness.  She has conducted multiple local, statewide, and national trainings/presentations on the subject, is a past NAMI Dane County Board member and a current member of the Board of Directors for Journey Mental Health. Chief Roman is committed to collaborative approaches to ensuring safety and to the practice of always reaching higher.



Secrets to Financial Happiness of a Lifetime

Valerie Johnson 


You may have heard “money can’t buy you happiness....but I’m happy already can’t I have the money too?”  Weather we lean in, take some time out of the workforce, or focus on volunteering, good income and expense management can make your life more secure and give you more options.  Learn some ways to make sure you have choices and options in your future at this workshop.  We’ll talk about how to get money, how to keep money and when money may not much matter.  

$ is the secret to happiness 2017.pdf


Valerie Johnson is CEO of Habitat for Humanity of Dane County. The organization builds homes, communities and hope by building 15 homes a year, running two home supply ReStores, financing the 250 homes they have built over 30 years and running a non-profit organization. She manages of staff of 30 employees, 3,000 volunteers, and an annual budget of seven million.

 

Previously she was Worldwide Foundation Executive Director for the World Council of Credit Unions, working in global microfinance development. Before World Council, she worked for the Agronomic Science Foundation, World Dairy Expo, and CUNA. 

 

Professional affiliations have included serving on the boards of Wis 4-H Foundation, Wisconsin Agricultural and Life Sciences Alumni Association (WALSAA), Leadership Wisconsin and memberships in downtown Madison Rotary, Association Foundation Group, Downtown Madison, Inc. (DMI) and TEMPO. She’s spoken to numerous groups including a cooperative microfinance panel at the United Nations.  A graduate with distinction of UW-Madison, she received one of the first International Credit Union Development Educator certificates.

 

Johnson lives with her fiancée, Jeff Renk, in Sun Prairie, and has two children, Kyle and Mikaela Breunig.  Kyle is with JP Morgan Chase in Chicago and Mikaela is a Michigan State graduate student in Plant Pathology.



The Freedom of Failure: Embracing Failing to Become Your Strongest Self

Sarah Carroll & teri engelke 


When asked why he hadn’t been successful in creating an electric light bulb after ten years of working on it, Thomas Edison said, “I know several thousand things that won’t work!”  Michael Jordan said, “I’ve missed more than 9000 shots in my career. I’ve lost almost 300 games. 26 times, I’ve been trusted to take the game winning shot and missed. I’ve failed over and over and over again in my life. And that is why I succeed.”  As poet and educator Nikki Giovanni said, “Mistakes are a fact of life. It is the response to the error that counts.”

 

There are famous examples of extraordinary light getting through some pretty deep cracks: Steve Jobs was fired from Apple, the company he founded, before he led the company to world domination. JK Rowling was jobless and nearly destitute before she wrote the hit series, Harry Potter.  Both Oprah Winfrey and Walt Disney were fired from their media positions in television and print news before experiencing success that has touched all of us. But what about us ordinary mortals?

 

In this interactive session, we’ll explore the concept of failure and what failure has to teach us. What do we do when we realize we botched a project because we didn’t have the skills, knowledge , or emotional intelligence to know better or to ask for help? What do we do when it’s not that boss or co-worker of yours who is creating difficulties – but when we are that person?  We only have to go to a bookstore’s self-help section to learn that coping with the effect of others’ failure on us is a socially acceptable form of rant. Where is the space to cope with our own failure? In a culture that sees failure as a sign of weakness, how do we transcend traditional responses to failure, and learn instead to embrace our darkest moments to become a stronger version of who we’re capable of being?   

 

This session will involve humor, storytelling, heavy doses reflection, and experiential learning. Sharing will be voluntary. Come prepared to identify and release some of what may be holding you back. There’s freedom in failure, if you can learn from it. 

 

As Maya Angelou said, “You may encounter many defeats, but you must not be defeated. In fact, it may be necessary to encounter the defeats, so you can know who you are, what you can rise from, how you can still come out of it.”


Freedom of Failure Session Handout (002).pdf


Sarah Carroll has a Master's in Education with an emphasis in adult learning and 15 years of human resources experience, including recruitment, onboarding, training and staff development, in a variety of settings including non-profits, healthcare, the performing arts, and information technology. She’s the HR competencies program developer and trainer with the HR Communities of Practice Team in the Office of Human Resources (OHR) at UW-Madison.  

teri engelke is a doctoral candidate at Colorado State University, studying Organizational Performance, Learning, and Change; her research is on digital game-based learning. She has almost 20 years of experience working on university and college campuses in a variety of roles from residence life/housing to human resources coordinating staff recruitment, training, change management, organizational development, social justice education, and talent development. She currently serves as the Assistant Dean for Human Resources for the School of Education at UW-Madison. 

 



     


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    Thank you for attending the ninth annual Women and Leadership Symposium. The speakers who have given us permission to post their presentations has been added underneath the speaker's bio and workshop description. 





    Since June of 2004, Sara Finger has been leading the effort to develop a new organizational coalition to unite, coordinate and amplify the voices of women’s health supporters in Wisconsin.  Prior to assuming this role, Sara was the Northeast Director of Membership and Professional Relations for the Wisconsin Medical Society. She received her undergraduate degree in Political Science from the University of Wisconsin Eau Claire. She was a 2009 Mid-America Public Health Leadership Institute Fellow and is Past President of the Wisconsin Public Health Association. In 2010, Sara received a Champion of Women’s Health Award from the Wisconsin Women’s Health Foundation. In 2011, she was recognized by the Wisconsin Coalition Against Sexual Assault with a Voices of Courage Award. In 2012, Sara was honored with a HealthWatch Wisconsin Outreach Effort Award for her coordination work of the Save BadgerCare Coalition, an Outstanding Recent Alumni Award from UW Eau Claire, was named a Woman to Watch by BRAVA Magazine and was named a Champion of Change by the White House for her work related to the Affordable Care Act.  In 2015, The Business Forum of Madison honored Sara with an Athena Young Professional Award.
    Since June of 2004, Sara Finger has been leading the effort to develop a new organizational coalition to unite, coordinate and amplify the voices of women’s health supporters in Wisconsin.  Prior to assuming this role, Sara was the Northeast Director of Membership and Professional Relations for the Wisconsin Medical Society. She received her undergraduate degree in Political Science from the University of Wisconsin Eau Claire. She was a 2009 Mid-America Public Health Leadership Institute Fellow and is Past President of the Wisconsin Public Health Association. In 2010, Sara received a Champion of Women’s Health Award from the Wisconsin Women’s Health Foundation. In 2011, she was recognized by the Wisconsin Coalition Against Sexual Assault with a Voices of Courage Award. In 2012, Sara was honored with a HealthWatch Wisconsin Outreach Effort Award for her coordination work of the Save BadgerCare Coalition, an Outstanding Recent Alumni Award from UW Eau Claire, was named a Woman to Watch by BRAVA Magazine and was named a Champion of Change by the White House for her work related to the Affordable Care Act.  In 2015, The Business Forum of Madison honored Sara with an Athena Young Professional Award.
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