UPCOMING EVENTS
                                                                

NEW! Register Today!
Thrive@UW-Madison: Communicating Effectively for Authentic Collaboration
September 12, 2017, 1:00 - 4:00 pm
21 N Park Street, Room 5045

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Thrive@UW-Madison:Communicating Effectively for Authentic Collaboration
September 19, 2017, 9:00 am - 12:00 pm
21 N Park Street, Room 5045

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Thrive@UW-Madison: Building and Managing Work Relationships
September 21, 2017, 1:00 - 4:00 pm
21 N Park Street, Room 5045

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FP2L - Effective Emails - Fundamentals in Business Writing
September 26, 2017, 9:00 - 11:30 am
21 N Park Street, Room 5045

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Thrive@UW-Madison: Thriving in a Time of Change
September 27, 2017, 9:00 am - 12:00 pm
21 N Park Street, Room 5045


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Establishing and Sustaining Communities of Practice
October 5, 2017, 9:00 - 11:00 am
October 12, 2017, 9:00 - 11:00 am
Ingraham Hall, Room 220

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FP2L - Personal Resiliency and Accountability
October 10, 2017, 9:00 am - 12:00 pm
21 N Park Street, Room 5045

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Understanding the Leadership Framework; Supervisors Share their Perspective
October 25, 2017, 9:00 - 10:00 am
Union South, See Today in the Union for Room location

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Thrive@UW-Madison: Creating Inclusive Work Environments
October 31, 2017, 9:00 am - 12:00 pm
21 N Park Street, Room 5045

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Thrive@UW-Madison: Building and Managing Work Relationships
November 2, 2017, 9:00 am - 12:00 pm
21 N Park Street, Room 5045

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FP2L - Running Effective Meetings
November 7, 2017, 9:00 am - 12:00 pm
21 N Park Street, Room 5045

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FP2L - Time and Self-Management
December 6, 2017, 9:00 - 11:30 am
21 N Park Street, Room 5045

NEW! Register Today!
Thrive@UW-Madison: Thriving in a Time of Change
December 7, 2017, 9:00 am - 12:00 pm
21 N Park Street, Room 5045

NEW! Register Today!
Thrive@UW-Madison: Creating Inclusive Work Environments
December 12, 2017, 1:00 - 4:00 pm
21 N Park Street, Room 5045

NEW! Register Today!
Thrive@UW-Madison: Communicating Effectively for Authentic Collaboration
December 14, 2017, 1:00 - 4:00 pm
21 N Park Street, Room 5045


Volunteer Tutors Needed
Cultural Linguistic Services, within the Office of Talent Management, is in need of tutors to help UW-Madison employees develop their learning in areas such as: English language, literacy (English and Spanish), writing, math, and other subjects. Scheduling and meeting locations are flexible. To become a tutor, complete an application or contact Jzong Thao at jzong.thao@wisc.edu.

R UWell?
Learn about UWell- the comprehensive wellness initiative aiming to advance the health and well-being of the entire UW-Madison community.

Do you have an upcoming event?
If you are interested in requesting to have an event registration posted on the Office of Talent Management Site, please complete your event information ​HERE.


The WiGrow program is an engagement effort aimed to increase the positive impact of student employment through supervisor and student employee conversations.
 

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Student Employee Resources

 

WiGrow aims to make student employment a high-impact practice at UW-Madison. By participating in WiGrow, student employees engage in intentional reflection and conversation, and are able to more readily connect the skills learned through employment to future endeavors. Provided are resources that are helpful for making connections in student employment, both during and after college.

 

Resources for Students

Forbes: The 10 Skills Employers Want Most in 2015 Graduates

George Kuh: Maybe Experience Really can be the Best Teacher

 

Transferable Skills Checklist

Career Services for Various Majors

WiGrow Form

 

Division of Student Life Website 

University Housing WiGrow Website 

University Housing WiGrow Video

Facilities Planning and Management WiGrow Website

IOWA GROWTM Program

 

 Suggested Readings

 

"Learning While Earning” – Jonathan Lewis

This dissertation from Jonathan Lewis explores which on-the-job university employment experiences relate to undergraduate learning outcomes by using data from Northwestern University’s student union. The learning domains included in the study are: Career Development, Civic and Community Engagement, Leadership, Ethics and Values, and Responsible Independence. Results affirm that student employment provides a context for student to achieve these learning outcomes. 

 

Lewis, J. (2007). Learning While Earning: Student Employment and Learning Outcomes. (Unpublished doctoral dissertation). Northwestern University, Evanston, IL.

 

 “Balancing work and academics in college: Why do students working 10 to 19 hours per week excel?” – L. Dundes & J. Marx

Given that 74% of undergraduates work an average of 25.5 hours per week while going to school, we know surprisingly little about how off-campus employment affects undergraduates and to what extent its impact varies by the number of hours worked. Our survey of undergraduates at a small liberal arts college found that the academic performance of students who worked off-campus was comparable to nonworkers. Notably, the academic performance (greater hours studied and higher grades) of students who worked 10-19 hours per week was superior to all other students, working and nonworking. We suggest that the increase in performance is due to an optimal work-college balance that establishes structure and discipline not achieved by working too few or too many hours. Yet students must balance the benefits of organization and efficiency with increased stress and reduced time for socializing (noted among student working 10 hours per week off-campus).

 

Dundes, L. & Marx, J. (2007). Balancing work and academics in college: Why do students working 10 to 19 hours per week excel? Journal of College Student Retention: Research, Theory & Practice, 8(1), 107-120 .

 

 “Earning While Learning: When and How Student Employment is Beneficial” – R. Geel & U. Backes-Gellner

In this publication, Geel and Backes-Gellner distinguish between student employees in positions not related to and related to their field of study. Results from the study show that students working in their field of study may experience positive short- and long-term labor market returns, including lower unemployment risk, shorter job-search duration, higher wage effects, and greater job responsibility.

 

Geel, R., & Backes-Gellner, U. (2012). Earning While Learning: When and How Student Employment is Beneficial. Labour, 26(3), 313-340.

 

“Learning and Earning: Working in College” – J. M. Orszag, P. R. Orszag & D. M. Whitmore

This article discusses how the number of hours worked during university enrollment impacts academic performance of college students, as measured through enrollment status and GPA. The number of hours worked per week is highly correlated with academic success. Working over 35 hours a week correlates with negative effects on performance, but part-time work may have positive effects on academics. 

               

Orszag, J. M., Orszag, P.R., & Whitmore, D. M. (2001). Learning and Earning: Working in College.

 

On-Campus Student Employment Creates Mutual Benefits for Students and Institutions” – Amy Haavik

Haavic investigates the changing face of university employment and the resultant implications for students and for university administration. Haavic uses comparisons from universities across the United States to develop suggestions to appropriately accommodate and enhance the impact of student employment, in order to strengthen the mutual benefit that university employment has on students and the institution itself.

 

Haavik, A. (2003). On-Campus Student Employment Creates Mutual Benefits for Students and Institutions.

 

WiGrow program contact: Lauren Dillard (ldillard@ohr.wisc.edu)


“Balancing work and academics in college: Why do students working 10 to 19 hours per week excel? – L. Dundes & J. Marx 


  • “Balancing work and academics in college: Why do students working 10 to 19 hours per week excel? – L. Dundes & J. Marx 

Community through respect & civility. Excellence through diversity. Success through learning.
Office of Talent Management
Office of Human Resources
University of Wisconsin-Madison
Suite 5101 -21 N Park Street - Madison, WI 53715
Contact our office at 608.262.7107
Email: Registrations2@ohr.wisc.edu

Office of Talent Management | Office of Human Resources | UW-Madison


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